Thursday, April 13, 2017

Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys Meet the WolfPack Mobile App




There’s a new App in the motorcycle sphere, and it’s poised to transform the way groups of motorcyclists ride together. The WolfPack™ Mobile App is designed to make group rides safer and facilitate the communication between riders in a group setting. With features such as turn-by-turn navigation, easy-to-access pre-canned group messages and the ability to see where the other riders in your pack are, the WolfPack Mobile App is a terrific way to keep your group intact.

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There will be a direct link inside the WolfPack Mobile App where riders can one-touch access Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys’ BAM (Breakdown Assistance for Motorcyclists) program for free emergency roadside assistance. “We are excited to support WolfPack’s request to add a BAM button to their App because Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys is dedicated to motorcycle safety.  WolfPack has designed an innovative App that has the potential to help group rides become safer, and more organized,” said Shawn Mahoney, Director, Marketing & Business Development at Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys.
Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys created BAM to help keep motorcyclists across the country safe and protected on the road. BAM is an excellent resource for free legal advice, and roadside assistance in case of a flat tire, running out of gas, or even a motorcycle accident. With the WolfPack Mobile App partnership, Bam Members will not have to look up the 1-800-4-BIKERS BAM network number; they will be automatically connected through the App.
Riding motorcycles with a group can be a fun experience. The chance to meet new people, make new friends and discover new roads holds quite an appeal. But the group riding experience isn’t always an intuitive one, unless you’re riding with your regular buddies. People have different agendas, and different makes and models of motorcycles require fuel at varying times.  Sometimes a machine requires roadside service.

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Jonathan Chashper, CEO of WolfPack, is the brains behind the brilliant idea. A serial entrepreneur who started riding six years ago, Chashper was the sweep rider on a group motorcycle ride when the idea for the App came to him. At one point the group tightened up and they realized that two of the riders had gotten disconnected from the group. They didn’t know what to do, and the stress level rose as the remaining riders tried to decide how to proceed.
At that moment, the idea was born. With a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science and an MBA from Northwestern, Chashper was excited to combine the areas of passion in his life. “It’s a very unique situation that we have here, where my hobby passion ties into my professional passion – my passion for bikes, ties into my passion for technology. My education, together with my hobby, allowed us to create WolfPack. It’s the perfect storm of my personal life hobby and my professional capabilities.  I love that,” said Chashper.
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The basic version of the WolfPack App is free and includes turn-by-turn navigation, group communications, group positioning, group management and the ability to plan and schedule routes for you and your pack. WolfPack Premium is available for $1.99 per month (or $19.99 for the full year) and offers Premium users the ability to create unlimited rides, set up to eight waypoints, navigate directly to a waypoint, capture interesting places along the ride, utilize an integrated chat system and even share pictures within your group.
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“Enjoyment is going to go up significantly using the WolfPack app because the stress level goes down. You don’t need to keep looking for your buddies, you don’t need to worry about them, wondering whether they know where you’re going and you don’t have to keep looking for them,” said Chashper. “The stress level goes down significantly and your ability to enjoy group riding goes up–because you don’t need to worry about losing people or telling everyone you need a pit stop.”
WolfPack’s goal is to give their users the best group riding experience possible.

Here’s a brief video showing how WolfPack works:


You can click on https://youtu.be/UZKH_qT4hBo to see all the advanced features and click HERE to download your own version of WolfPack. Every Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys BAM member will have full use of the basic WolfPack App in this exclusive opportunity.
Now that’s something to howl at!









Thursday, March 30, 2017

You've Got to See this Insane Monster Energy Video...




Awesome key highlights from Monster's Supercross event this year:




Revolutionary New Moto Technology You Need to Know About

adaptive lights.PNGHere at Cycle Trader, we’re always on the lookout for new technology and updates in our industry. We’re here to keep you informed about revolutionary changes in the motorcycle world, and recently, we’ve come across a list of game-changing new developments we think you should definitely know about.




These unique headlights dynamically shed light through the darkness and can intelligently sense things like leaning corners, helping to eliminate dangerous blind spots as you drive.





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Helmets with Augmented Reality (AR) give you a 360 degree view of the road, helping you to have a better understanding of what’s going on around you, since bikes don’t have rearview mirrors.
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Say farewell to quickly overheating engines. These guys are much more forgiving than air-cooled models, taking much more time for heat damage to occur.








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Stabilizing ride-by-wire technology gives a whole new meaning to ride customization, including potential features like cruise and traction control and ride mode selectors.

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15-25% more power, torque, and efficiency? We can dig it. Plus, according to New Atlas, it’ll only cost you around a 10th of the price you’d spend on a turbo setup.






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This new product is pretty simple: a high-quality bluetooth driven concert, right in your helmet. No strings attached.








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Issued by your command, these visor inserts tint themselves to adjust to brightness levels as you ride. With UV-protection and anti-fog coating, inserts like these are the answer to riders’ visual difficulties.
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No more worrying about choosing gloves based on the ability to use GPS or answer a phone call - this stuff applies to whatever gloves you want, so you don’t have to sacrifice the quality and type of gloves that are right for you.










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This new development is definitely still in the works, but according to reports of Ducati patents filings, “adjustable nozzles capable of being fitted to the end of exhaust pipes to alter escaping gas into thrust” - much like powerhouse known to power supersonic jets.




Now, you tell us- what are your favorite tech-based motorcycle accessories?
Comment below to share.

Monster Energy 2017 Recap: How did the Cycle Trader Rock River Yamaha Race Team do?



had a great weekend at Lucas Oil Stadium (Home of the Indianapolis Colts). Both Cycle Trader’s Rock River Yamaha racers had great races, with Alex Ray clocking the 25th fastest lap for both timed qualifiers and Lorenzo Locurcio ending the timed practice with the 15th fastest time in the 250 class.

As Alex Ray noted,

“The weekend was good overall. I had the speed and everything I need to do my best, I just had a little tough luck with a crash in practice. I also went down in the LCQ, but there were some positives to take away from the weekend...I’m healthy and confident that my best result is within reach.”

Curious to hear all the details from the race this weekend?
Read more details at the Cycle Trader Rock River Yamaha page today.





























RideApart Rides and Crashes the Street Rod (Riding it Was More Fun)

2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod – First Ride Review

You may remember that when Harley-Davidson's Street 750 first came out, one of the biggest criticisms people had of the bike was that it didn't live up to the Harley standard in terms of fit and finish. It looked cheap – not very well put together. Well, Harley heard you loud and clear and it has fixed that with its all-new Street Rod model.
It looks well put together, and it is. This thing is built like a damn tank. I know because I crashed one.
We'll get to that story – and the reason Common Tread's Lemmy and Cycle World's Joseph Gustafson have given me the nickname "Trashcan" – in a moment. But first I want to encourage you to test ride the Street Rod for yourself. This bike represents a new direction for Harley-Davidson and it has something of a mountain to climb in terms of ensuring retail success. The conventional wisdom is that Harley's ever-dwindling core audience will turn their noses up at this new motorcycle, so the 114-year-old company has to reach out to riders that have hitherto been put off by its, ah, conservative reputation.
I have a lot of positive things to say about the Street Rod (along with a few criticisms), and I suspect the majority of my peers will as well. But that still may not convince the skeptics. Which is why I say you should ride one. Harley-Davidson has set itself a goal of putting two million additional butts on motorcycle seats over the next decade and one of the ways it plans to do that is through test rides. H-D dealerships want you to come in and throw a leg over, so take them up on the offer.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

First Impressions

When you do visit that dealership the first thing you'll notice about the Street Rod is that it is, as I say, better looking than the cruiser platform that shares its 750cc liquid-cooled V-twin powerplant. This is something you actually wouldn't mind being seen riding. None of this "built for customization" nonsense; you get good quality and good looks right out of the box.
Well, mostly. I'm not a fan of the look of the exhaust. But I suppose we can blame those pesky Europeans for that one. Perhaps more so than Harley's other models the Street Rod is aimed at customers beyond the golden walls of Trumpistan and has been built to meet the very strictest of government regulations. In a post-Euro IV world everybody's got big cans.
Despite being built to appease European bureaucrats, the Street Rod maintains a muscular, American aesthetic. Whereas the Street 750 looks like a Chinese bike that someone slapped a bar and shield decal on, the Street Rod looks like an actual Harley-Davidson. Yes, there are some elements that betray its US $8,699 (£6,745) asking price, but I don't personally feel the compromises are unreasonable.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Engine and Transmission

As with any Harley, the engine is the star of the show here. The Revolution X V-twin platform is being put to such good use in this roadster it's hard to imagine it was ever intended for use in a cruiser. Peak torque (47.9 ft lb, or 65 Nm, according to Harley) arrives at 4,000 rpm and peak horsepower (Harley doesn't give those figures, but an educated guess and data from my derriere dyno suggests 60-something horses) comes in just south of 9,000 rpm. Wander a little north of that peak horsepower and you'll bang against the rev limiter, but even high-up in the revs, there's fun to be had. Hitting the rev limiter functioned almost like a quickshifter, allowing me to click up a gear without pulling in the clutch or easing off the throttle. Additionally, it's in these dizzying heights of the rev range that the engine sounds best.
I'm inclined to compare the feel of the Street Rod's engine against the Indian Scout Sixty's 1000cc V-twin, and the 900cc parallel twin in the Triumph Street Cup. Of the three, the Street Rod feels the most brutish. We can now see that the Street Rod is (more or less) the bike the Winter Soldier rides in Captain America: Civil War, and that makes sense. This is totally the Harley that an unstoppable assassin with a metal arm would choose.
It's an equally good choice for commuters, who will appreciate its drama-free capacity to loll along the highway as well as chug through urban slog. Keeping with the above Street Cup and Scout Sixty comparison, the Street Rod's six-speed transmission is probably the least smooth of the three, but not to any extent that you'll really care. That said, my own experience was that neutral was occasionally difficult to find. This was exacerbated by the fact the green "N" light on the bike's single clock seems to take a little while to confirm that you have indeed found neutral. I always got there in the end, but worst case scenario, the clutch is light enough I could have just sat through stop light cycles with the lever pulled in.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Ride Quality and Brakes

When you go on your own test ride, the first thing you will complain about is the ergonomics. The seating position is very squished, with the rider adopting a baseball catcher's stance – legs splayed open, knees high. Motorcycle.com's John Burns was part of the pack of journalists attending the press ride in Florida and he said that from behind I looked like I was milking a cow. You'll want to make sure you don't have anything in your jeans' front pockets because they will be pulled pretty tight. The riding position was not just an issue for me at 6 foot 1 inch tall, Burns – who is probably 5 to 6 inches shorter than me – also noted that it was a little awkward.
But here's the thing: truthfully, you get used to it. In the first five minutes I was using all the profanities I know (and I know quite a lot – I live in Britain, after all), but on my second day with the bike, toward the end of a 157-mile ride, I was downright enjoying myself. No doubt the fun of the bike's engine helps one to ignore discomfort, but the effectiveness of the suspension, too, plays its part – ensuring that most of the road's unpleasantries are not passed on to the rider.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod
Preload on the rear piggyback shocks can be adjusted with a standard wrench; no need to worry about losing a special tool. The Sunshine State is not known for twisties, but in those corners that I could find the bike was happy to be thrown around. You'll never touch down pegs in normal riding. In spirited, probably-risking-a-license-ban riding, it's likely the exhaust would touch down before the peg, which serves as an incentive to try.
Perhaps reflecting its price tag, the Street Rod's brakes are a little off/on. I found it difficult to be nuanced, especially with the rear brake. Doing that "feet up challenge" thing at stop lights was harder than it needed to be. But overall I was happy. I love the dual front discs, both for their look and their effectiveness. ABS comes standard in the European Union; it's available as a worthwhile option in the United States.
We learned the hard way that the brakes perform excellently in emergency stops. I mentioned above that Harley took members of the press on a 157-mile route through and around Ocala National Forest in Central Florida. I only completed 135 of those miles. As the press group was zipping along County Road 304 a freak gust of wind blew a 32-gallon trash can into the road, directly into my path. The Street Rod has considerably more ground clearance than any other Harley-Davidson model, but not so much that I was able to completely surmount one of Rubbermaid's fine products at 60 mph. I lowsided, then slid and rolled about 150 feet before ending up in a grassy ditch; the Street Rod continued sliding another 100-150 feet beyond that.
After the incident (which I survived with only a few bruises because ATGATT), John Burns, who had been riding directly behind me, said: "I had been looking for an opportunity to test the brakes. Thanks."
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Build and Features

Take a look at the photo above. That's what my bike looked like after the crash. Keen observers will note that it doesn't really look like a motorcycle that has hit an object at 60 mph, then slid some 300 feet across the pavement. Yeah, that mirror's scratched up and the peg's been shredded, but by and large it looks rideable. And, indeed, it was. When Harley-Davidson's chase truck arrived, the bike started on the first try and they were able to ride it onto the truck.
So, as I said at the beginning: this thing is built like a damn tank. And I can't help but love it for that. Even if I hadn't been able to put this bike to such an extreme test I would have been inclined to believe it would hold up for a long time. Take a look at forums for issues related to the Street 750 and you'll see that Harley-Davidson has addressed those problems in delivering the Street Rod. The mirrors are good; the brakes are good; there are no particularly ugly welds, or unsightly wires, or plastic badges that look like they came from a goodie bag at a child's birthday party.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod
Speaking of goodies, the Street Rod is pretty basic when it comes to technowhizzbangery. ABS is about it. Which is fine. I love gadgetry on bikes, but the pure nature of this roadster means you don't really feel the want of anything. The single clock provides a decent amount of information: an analogue speedometer with a small digital display that can provide odometer, trip meters, gear and rev counter, or time. The button to click through this information is located on the clock, old-school style. As is my complaint with every Harley-Davidson model, the speedometer numbers are too small. Considering the fact Harley's core audience is older than me, I find it hard to believe I'm the only person who has this complaint.
On the plus side, the bike's turn signals are operated by a single switch on the left grip. This is as God intended us to indicate our turns, rather than the usual Harley method of having a button on each grip.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

The Little Things

Math dummy that I am, I would appreciate a fuel gauge to help me stay alert to how much dino-juice is left in the Street Rod's 3.5 US gallon (13.2 liter) tank. Additionally, I wouldn't complain if said fuel tank were narrower. I suspect the ergonomics of the bike would not irk me so much if my knees weren't both high and wide.
If I owned a Street Rod I'd probably invest some time trying to determine whether I could move its pegs a little further back. That, too, would help with ergonomics and it would eliminate the problem of having the pegs be exactly where I wanted to place my legs at a stop. Related to that, if the pegs are going to stay where they are, I'd like to see Harley-Davidson add a spring to prevent riders from accidentally folding them up, as I did on multiple occasions. I would be at a stoplight, it would go green and I would lift my foot to put the bike into gear, but in doing so also fold the peg.
Another thing I'd try to do as a Street Rod owner is relocate the exhaust. At present, it sticks out too far. The bike's seat height is roughly 30.4 inches (772 mm), but you'll need to be at least as tall as me to put both feet flat on the ground because the exhaust forces a wide stance. That said, I'm not clever enough to guess where else it could go.
2017 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Verdict

Things like the squished ergonomics, the ugly, sticky-out exhaust, and the Street Rod's weight (524 lbs wet, or 238 kg) will be fodder for those whose hearts are forever hardened against Harley-Davidson. Forget about those dudes. Test ride the bike and decide for yourself. The Street Rod is a motorcycle not without its faults but, importantly, it is a bike that is good enough to exist without caveats. You don't have to adjust your perspective to assess this bike. You don't have to say something like: "This is a really good motorcycle, you know, for a Harley..."
Scratch the name off the tank (if you can; there was only minor paint damage on the one I slid down a highway) and it is a bike that can hold its own price- and performance-wise against American, European, and Japanese competitors. It has better fit and finish than a Yamaha XSR700; its engine has more bad-assitude than a Triumph Street Cup; it handles better than an Indian Scout Sixty. And so on and so on.
After that, you can add the fact that, yeah, it is a Harley-Davidson. It is a real Harley-Davidson; a bike that looks and feels like a natural part of the company's ethos. Lemmy has said he will be surprised and disappointed if this model does not perform well. I will be, too. This is the bike people have been asking for. Meanwhile, Indian Motorcycle should definitely be concerned. It seems the resurrection of its old rival has reinvigorated Harley-Davidson and it is landing a big punch with a bike like this. The boys and girls in Milwaukee have promised to deliver 50 new models over the next five years – the Street Rod being one of the first. Goodness knows what else they've got up their sleeve.

Rider Stats

Rider: Chris "Crashcan" Cope
Height: 6 feet 1 inch
Physical Build: Lanky
Riding Experience: Usually upright. Sometimes less so.

Gear

Helmet: HJC RPHA 11
Back Protector: Knox Fastback

Backpack: Kriega R20

Tuesday, March 07, 2017

Motorcycle Accounts Everyone Should be Following on Instagram: Who to Follow Series, Episode 1

Photo via The Mighty Motor and Jug Junky

Recently, we've noticed hundreds of incredible Instagram accounts dedicated to bringing motorcyclists a social media experience like no other- but how to decide which ones to follow? Don't worry, we've rounded up some of the best for you. In this first edition of Who to Follow on Instagram, we've got 45 viral profiles sure to bring motivation and awe to your day.



Cycle Trader. We couldn't go without mentioning this - we LOVE Instagram. There really is no better place to share rider experiences, check out the coolest new rides, and get to know millions of people in the rider community. With our primary mission being to help you buy, sell, research, and trade with the knowledge you need, we also want to help you make the absolute most out of the rider experience, and use our Instagram page to share industry news, new model lineups, inspiring quotes about riding, and reposts of some of the coolest 'grams we've ever seen. 










Meta. Known for being an extremely high-quality publication, META is a motorcycle media and news company that prides themselves on “celebrating motorcycle lifestyle through timeless, art driven, culture based content.”


Their photos are heavily travel and adventure influenced, and you'll never get bored with their unique spin angles and insane eye for catching the perfect balance of color when it comes to moto photography.













Pipeburn. If you're a fan of custom work, this is one account you can't go without following. 

Posting daily new pics of custom motorcycles, cafe racers, bobbers, scramblers, flat trackers, and more, the jaw-dropping account is known for sharing photos of  'whatever gets them moving.'

Be careful, though- you may not want to open this account up at work, or you might spend yourself spending hours upon hours scrolling through their gorgeous bikes!















Brother_moto. 

We aren't joking when we say this account is truly one-of-a-kind. Nestled in the streets of Atlanta, Brother Moto is a DIY motorcycle garage with an espresso bar right there in the shop. When they say their shop is a "curated experience like no other," they mean it. If you ever find yourself in this Georgia city, be sure to stop on by and grab a cup of coffee, and see what they're really all about.

Nowhere close to Georgia? No worries- they post amazing things to Instagram all the time, so following them is pretty much the next best thing.








Motorcyclesofinstagram.

"This one probably sounds a bit generic at first, but trust us - their posts are anything but. Based out of Los Angeles, California, this account considers themselves a showroom for the bikes of everyone across the world - basically, a showroom of your bikes - a showroom for all the motorcycles of Instagram.

Getting the chance to be featured on their page is simple- just hashtag #motorcyclesofinstagram and tag them @motorcyclesofinstagram, and you might just get a featured post.




What moto accounts do you follow on Instagram? Comment and let us know- we may even include them in the next post of our Who to Follow Series.